Welcome To My Website
Assurance Of heaven



    

Paul wrote this letter about 56 A. D. when he was in the city of Corinth. Paul had not yet visited the church in Rome. He wanted to go there and he prayed that God would make this visit possible (Rom. 1:10-12; 15:23-24). This makes the letter to the Romans unique. Most of Paul’s other letters were written to churches where he had personally ministered. But here was a church (the church at Rome) where Paul had not been and where Paul had not taught. We might ask this question: When Paul gets to Rome what is he going to teach? Here in the book of Romans Paul gives a doctrinal preview of the content of his teaching ministry. What Paul unfolds in these 16 chapters is nothing less than a doctrinal masterpiece. What is Christianity all about? What is its central message? What is the true gospel of God? What really is the good news of salvation? What kind of message did the church’s greatest apostle preach wherever he went? To find the answer to all these questions we must turn to the greatest doctrinal book in the New Testament -- the epistle of Paul to the Romans.
The influence of the Book of Romans is incalculable. A group of scholars once made a list of the fifteen greatest books, books that were great based upon their beneficial influence upon humanity. Included in this list were John Wesley's Journal, Luther's 95 Theses, Augustine's City of God and John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. As his Journal reveals, Wesley was an unsaved preacher until he read the book of Romans and understood God's way of salvation. Luther, a Catholic monk, was greatly influenced by Romans 1:17, "The just shall live by faith," which opened his eyes to the truth of justification by faith. Augustine's City of God was founded on his study of the Book of Romans. Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress was written after reading the Book of Romans in prison. It became the best selling book of all time, next to the Bible. Among the greatest books of the world, four which come near the top of the list were all directly influenced by the Book of Romans. Has the Book of Romans changed your life?
Romans 1:1
Note the first sentence (where do you find the first period?). It is 126 words long in the KJV. This is the characteristic style of Paul (see Eph. 1:3-14). The Apostle John had a different style (short, simple yet profound sentences ) -- see 1 John 4:8,19 etc. The correct doctrine of the divine inspiration of Scripture goes far beyond the idea of mere mechanical dictation. Instead the personalities and styles of the human writers are clearly observable, and yet what they wrote is free from error and exactly what God intended--see 2 Peter 1:20-21 and 2 Tim. 3:16. Each Bible writer had his own unique style and characteristics, and yet God used them as His penmen to record exactly what the Lord wanted to be included in His Word.
In verse 1 Paul tells us three things about himself:
1) SERVANT= slave, bond-servant, love-slave of Jesus Christ
This is an amazing statement when we consider Paul’s past background (see Acts 7:58; 8:1-3; 9:1-2; 1 Cor. 15:9; 1 Tim. 1:13-15). Saul of Tarsus was the church’s greatest enemy. How did the church’s greatest enemy become the church’s greatest apostle? How can we explain the amazing transformation described in Galatians 1:23? How can Saul the persecutor become Paul the "servant of Jesus Christ" (Rom. 1:1)? SOMETHING MUST HAVE HAPPENED!!
According to the New Testament, what happened to cause such a change? What caused the conversion of Saul of Tarsus? See 1 Corinthians 9:1 -- "have I not SEEN Jesus Christ our Lord" and compare Acts 9:3-6 and 1 Cor. 15:8. Hostile critics of Christianity must come up with a satisfactory explanation for the conversion of Paul. George Lyttelton (1709-1773) studied the conversion of St. Paul in an attempt to disprove Christianity. He was converted as a result of his research. In his remarkable paper, "Observations on the Conversion of St. Paul" [This article is found in the classic set called The Fundamentals edited by R.A. Torrey and A.C.Dixon and others, Vol. II, page 353] he sets forth four propositions which seem to exhaust all the possibilities in the case:
Paul was an impostor who said what he knew to be false, with an intent to deceive (he really didn’t see the risen Christ, but he said he did).
He was a fanatic ("enthusiast") who suffered from the force of an overheated imagination (he sincerely thought he saw the risen Christ, but he really did not).
He was deceived by the fraud of others (others somehow tricked him into thinking he saw the risen Christ).
What he declared to be the cause of his conversion did actually happen, and therefore the Christian religion is a divine revelation (Paul really did see the risen Christ and therefore Christianity is true and Christ is alive!).
What problems do you see with the first three possibilities?
2) Apostle =one who is sent on a mission
God had a unique and special ministry for Paul and the other apostles. ARE THERE STILL APOSTLES IN THE CHURCH TODAY?
In Eph. 2:20 the apostles are said to be "foundational" men. A foundation is only laid once at the beginning, of a building project. The apostles were needed in the beginning of the church age to fulfill their special "foundational" ministry.
No one today can meet the qualifications of an apostle, because an apostle must have SEEN the RISEN CHRIST (1 Cor. 9:1; 15:8-9 and Acts 1:22 -- finding a replacement for Judas). Christ does not appear to men today (1 Peter 1:8; John 16:10).
Application: see Acts 2:42. Today we do not have apostles but we have the DOCTRINE or the TEACHING OF THE APOSTLES. We do not have the Apostle Paul today, but we do have the DOCTRINE OF THE APOSTLE PAUL, namely the BOOK OF ROMANS (and his other writings that are now part of Scripture).
3) Separated unto the gospel of God
There is a negative aspect to separation (separation from sin, from the things of the world, etc.) but this verse emphasizes one of the positive aspects (not SEPARATION FROM but SEPARATION UNTO). Paul’s dedication and devotion to the gospel of God is seen in Romans1:16; 1 Cor. 1:17-18; 2:1-2; 9:16; 15:1-4; Eph. 6:19-20; Acts 20:21,24.
Key phrase in the book of Romans = THE GOSPEL OF GOD (this is what the book of Romans is all about)
GOSPEL= good news, glad tidings
Nowhere in the Bible is the good news of salvation more clearly unfolded than in the book of Romans. Paul skillfully and systematically presents the gospel of God in this epistle. Today there is much confusion as to what the gospel really is and how it should be presented (See What is the True Gospel?). Let’s carefully study how Paul defined end explained and presented the gospel, and may we never forget where Paul got his gospel from (see Galatians 1:11-12). Also let’s be on the alert for FALSE GOSPELS (see Galatians 1:6-9).
Paul wrote this letter about 56 A. D. when he was in the city of Corinth. Paul had not yet visited the church in Rome. He wanted to go there and he prayed that God would make this visit possible (Rom. 1:10-12; 15:23-24). This makes the letter to the Romans unique. Most of Paul’s other letters were written to churches where he had personally ministered. But here was a church (the church at Rome) where Paul had not been and where Paul had not taught. We might ask this question: When Paul gets to Rome what is he going to teach? Here in the book of Romans Paul gives a doctrinal preview of the content of his teaching ministry. What Paul unfolds in these 16 chapters is nothing less than a doctrinal masterpiece. What is Christianity all about? What is its central message? What is the true gospel of God? What really is the good news of salvation? What kind of message did the church’s greatest apostle preach wherever he went? To find the answer to all these questions we must turn to the greatest doctrinal book in the New Testament -- the epistle of Paul to the Romans.
The influence of the Book of Romans is incalculable. A group of scholars once made a list of the fifteen greatest books, books that were great based upon their beneficial influence upon humanity. Included in this list were John Wesley's Journal, Luther's 95 Theses, Augustine's City of God and John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. As his Journal reveals, Wesley was an unsaved preacher until he read the book of Romans and understood God's way of salvation. Luther, a Catholic monk, was greatly influenced by Romans 1:17, "The just shall live by faith," which opened his eyes to the truth of justification by faith. Augustine's City of God was founded on his study of the Book of Romans. Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress was written after reading the Book of Romans in prison. It became the best selling book of all time, next to the Bible. Among the greatest books of the world, four which come near the top of the list were all directly influenced by the Book of Romans. Has the Book of Romans changed your life?
Romans 1:1
Note the first sentence (where do you find the first period?). It is 126 words long in the KJV. This is the characteristic style of Paul (see Eph. 1:3-14). The Apostle John had a different style (short, simple yet profound sentences ) -- see 1 John 4:8,19 etc. The correct doctrine of the divine inspiration of Scripture goes far beyond the idea of mere mechanical dictation. Instead the personalities and styles of the human writers are clearly observable, and yet what they wrote is free from error and exactly what God intended--see 2 Peter 1:20-21 and 2 Tim. 3:16. Each Bible writer had his own unique style and characteristics, and yet God used them as His penmen to record exactly what the Lord wanted to be included in His Word.
In verse 1 Paul tells us three things about himself:
1) SERVANT= slave, bond-servant, love-slave of Jesus Christ
This is an amazing statement when we consider Paul’s past background (see Acts 7:58; 8:1-3; 9:1-2; 1 Cor. 15:9; 1 Tim. 1:13-15). Saul of Tarsus was the church’s greatest enemy. How did the church’s greatest enemy become the church’s greatest apostle? How can we explain the amazing transformation described in Galatians 1:23? How can Saul the persecutor become Paul the "servant of Jesus Christ" (Rom. 1:1)? SOMETHING MUST HAVE HAPPENED!!
According to the New Testament, what happened to cause such a change? What caused the conversion of Saul of Tarsus? See 1 Corinthians 9:1 -- "have I not SEEN Jesus Christ our Lord" and compare Acts 9:3-6 and 1 Cor. 15:8. Hostile critics of Christianity must come up with a satisfactory explanation for the conversion of Paul. George Lyttelton (1709-1773) studied the conversion of St. Paul in an attempt to disprove Christianity. He was converted as a result of his research. In his remarkable paper, "Observations on the Conversion of St. Paul" [This article is found in the classic set called The Fundamentals edited by R.A. Torrey and A.C.Dixon and others, Vol. II, page 353] he sets forth four propositions which seem to exhaust all the possibilities in the case:
Paul was an impostor who said what he knew to be false, with an intent to deceive (he really didn’t see the risen Christ, but he said he did).
He was a fanatic ("enthusiast") who suffered from the force of an overheated imagination (he sincerely thought he saw the risen Christ, but he really did not).
He was deceived by the fraud of others (others somehow tricked him into thinking he saw the risen Christ).
What he declared to be the cause of his conversion did actually happen, and therefore the Christian religion is a divine revelation (Paul really did see the risen Christ and therefore Christianity is true and Christ is alive!).
What problems do you see with the first three possibilities?
2) Apostle =one who is sent on a mission
God had a unique and special ministry for Paul and the other apostles. ARE THERE STILL APOSTLES IN THE CHURCH TODAY?
In Eph. 2:20 the apostles are said to be "foundational" men. A foundation is only laid once at the beginning, of a building project. The apostles were needed in the beginning of the church age to fulfill their special "foundational" ministry.
No one today can meet the qualifications of an apostle, because an apostle must have SEEN the RISEN CHRIST (1 Cor. 9:1; 15:8-9 and Acts 1:22 -- finding a replacement for Judas). Christ does not appear to men today (1 Peter 1:8; John 16:10).
Application: see Acts 2:42. Today we do not have apostles but we have the DOCTRINE or the TEACHING OF THE APOSTLES. We do not have the Apostle Paul today, but we do have the DOCTRINE OF THE APOSTLE PAUL, namely the BOOK OF ROMANS (and his other writings that are now part of Scripture).
3) Separated unto the gospel of God
There is a negative aspect to separation (separation from sin, from the things of the world, etc.) but this verse emphasizes one of the positive aspects (not SEPARATION FROM but SEPARATION UNTO). Paul’s dedication and devotion to the gospel of God is seen in Romans1:16; 1 Cor. 1:17-18; 2:1-2; 9:16; 15:1-4; Eph. 6:19-20; Acts 20:21,24.
Key phrase in the book of Romans = THE GOSPEL OF GOD (this is what the book of Romans is all about)
GOSPEL= good news, glad tidings
Nowhere in the Bible is the good news of salvation more clearly unfolded than in the book of Romans. Paul skillfully and systematically presents the gospel of God in this epistle. Today there is much confusion as to what the gospel really is and how it should be presented (See What is the True Gospel?). Let’s carefully study how Paul defined end explained and presented the gospel, and may we never forget where Paul got his gospel from (see Galatians 1:11-12). Also let’s be on the alert for FALSE GOSPELS (see Galatians 1:6-9).